Sexual Assault/Violence Resources

Reporting Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Harassment,  and Sexual Violence

Students may report discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence to the Title IX Coordinator, Sylvia Edgar, 636-922-8654, sedgar@stchas.edu, Room ADM 1242; or the Deputy Title IX Coordinator/Dean of Student Success, 636-922-8259, Room ADM 1123.

Employees may report discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence to the Title IX Coordinator, Sylvia Edgar, 636-922-8654, sedgar@stchas.edu, Room ADM 1242; or the Deputy Title IX Coordinator/Vice President for Human Resources, Donna Davis, 636-922-8300, ddavis@stchas.edu, Room ADM 1242.

Reports of discrimination or harassment may also be made to any Administrative Officer of the College listed below:

  • President: 636-922-8380
  • Vice President for Academic & Student Affairs: 636-922-8356
  • Vice President for Administrative Services: 636-922-8359
  • Vice President for Marketing & Communications: 636-922-8277
  • Vice President for College Advancement and Planning: 636-922-8472

The Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators will accept anonymous reports of discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence and will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to such reports. However, the College’s ability to respond to anonymous reports may be limited.

Individuals may also report sexual violence to the Department of Public Safety (DPS) at 636-922-8545, CS 103. A report to DPS will be considered a report to law enforcement. Though DPS can assist victims of sexual violence in accessing services and/or contacting the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinators, DPS may also proceed with pursuing a criminal investigation and/or criminal charges with or without the victim’s consent.

The College will respond in a prompt and equitable manner to allegations of discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence and will respond appropriately to those who violate this policy, up to and including dismissal from employment or expulsion from the College, as applicable.

Though the College encourages all individuals to bring reports of discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence to the attention of the Title IX Coordinator and/or Deputy Title IX Coordinators, credit-seeking students who wish to maintain confidentiality may contact the mental health counselor, which is provided by the College free of charge for credit-seeking students, at 636-922-8571. Unlike reports of discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, or sexual violence made to other College officials (which must be reported to the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinators), credit-seeking students can speak with the mental health counselor confidentially and absent the student’s consent, such reports or conversations will not be reported to the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinators for further investigation pursuant to this policy. The mental health counselor can, however, assist the credit-seeking student in contacting the Title IX Coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinators to report discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, or sexual violence, at the student’s request.

Employees may contact the Employee Assistance Program at 800-356-0856 for confidential assistance.

Any individual who wishes to maintain confidentiality may speak with off-campus rape or domestic violence crisis counselors and off-campus members of the clergy and chaplains.

While the Title IX Coordinator, the Dean of Student Success, and the Vice President for Human Resources are formally responsible for enforcing compliance with discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence policies, ensuring that the campus is free of discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence is a shared responsibility of all members of the College community. A person does not have to be the direct target or victim of the discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, or sexual violence to report it. As mentioned above, this policy covers conduct occurring on property owned or operated by the College, at College-sanctioned functions, and may also apply to off-campus conduct that adversely affects the campus environment. Thus, conduct that occurs off-campus may violate this policy and should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinators.

If employee discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, sexual violence, or retaliation is observed by, or reported to a College official (administrators, managers, and supervisors), then that official has the duty to immediately report the matter to the Title IX Coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinators. If student discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, sexual violence, or retaliation is observed by, or reported to any employee who could be reasonably perceived to have authority or duty to report or address these issues (administrator, manager, supervisor, faculty member dean, coach, Athletic Director, academic counselor/advisor, club advisor, law enforcement or public safety officer, or student conduct administrator), then that official has the duty to immediately report the matter to the Title IX Coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinators. The fact that the alleged victim does not wish to file a complaint does not relieve the official of this responsibility.

If discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, sexual violence, or retaliation of any kind is observed by or reported to an employee not listed above, that employee should report the matter to the Title IX Coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinators. The employee may initially be able to omit personally identifiable information. The Title IX Coordinator, Dean of Student Success, and/or the Vice President for Human Resources will guide the employee with regard to how much detail is needed in the initial report. Following the initial report, College officials may need additional information in order to fulfill the College’s obligations under Title IX. In taking these actions, the College will always be guided by the goals of empowering the victim and allowing the victim to retain as much control of the process as possible. No employee or representative of the College can or should promise confidentiality. However, the mental health counselor of the College will maintain confidentiality excluding threat of harm to oneself or another.

The method for reporting discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence is also outlined in the St. Charles Community College Reporting Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence (Report Procedure). A copy of that document may be obtained from the following locations:

  • Welcome Center, Administration Building
  • Office of Human Resources
  • Office of Academic and Student Affairs
  • Office of Administrative Services
  • Department of Marketing and Communications
  • Department of Enrollment Services
  • Office of the Dean of Student Success

The College recognizes that students who have been drinking and/or using drugs (whether such use is voluntary or involuntary) at the time an incident of sexual violence occurs may be hesitant to report such incidents due to fear of potential consequences for their own conduct. The College strongly encourages students to report incidents of sexual violence to campus officials. A bystander reporting in good faith or a victim reporting sexual violence to College officials or law enforcement will not be subject to campus conduct action for violations of alcohol and/or drug use policies occurring at or near the time of the sexual violence.

The College strictly prohibits retaliation of any kind against an individual for reporting discrimination, harassment, or sexual violence pursuant to this policy, assisting someone with a complaint of discrimination, harassment, or sexual violence, or participating in an investigation/disciplinary procedures following a complaint of discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment, or sexual violence. Examples of such prohibited retaliation include threats, intimidation, reprisals, adverse employment actions, or adverse educational actions. Any incidents of alleged retaliation should be immediately reported to the Title IX Coordinator or the Deputy Title IX Coordinators. The College will take appropriate corrective action, including disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal or expulsion, if retaliation, which is prohibited by this policy occurs.

Definitions

Sexual Harassment

Sexual Harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment includes any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other unwelcome written, electronic, verbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

  • Submission to such conduct is made, explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of an individual’s education, employment, or participation in College activity;
  • Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for decisions affecting that individual’s academic standing, employment status, or participation in a College program or activity;
  • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s academic or work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for that individual’s employment, education, or participation in a College program or activity. (This third situation is commonly known as hostile environment sexual harassment.)

Sexual harassment may occur between members of the same or opposite sex; sexual harassment may occur between persons of the same or different College status (faculty, staff, student, visitor, vendor, other). Groups may also be found to engage in sexual harassment.

Harassment based on a person’s sex is not limited to instances involving sexual behavior. Behavior that is based on sexual advances or overtones, as well as sex or gender harassment because of a person’s sex (for example, being denied equal treatment because a person is a female or male, or being treated differently because of gender stereotypes) may be considered sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment may include unwelcome sexually-oriented kidding or teasing, sexual innuendos, sexually-oriented jokes, jokes about gender-specific traits or which are gender-based, or display of obscene material.

Someone who is not the direct and immediate target of sexual harassment may still be a victim of sexual harassment. Harassing behavior toward others may be so offensive, demeaning or disruptive as to constitute a hostile work or academic environment, though not specifically directed at the observer or individual lodging a complaint.

Sexual Assault

Sexual Assault is actual or attempted physical sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent. Sexual assault includes, but is not limited to:

  • Intentional touching of another person’s intimate parts without that person’s consent;
  • Other intentional sexual contact with another person without that person’s consent; 
  • Coercing, forcing, or attempting to coerce or force a person to touch another person’s intimate parts without that person’s consent;
  • Penetration, no matter how slight, of (1) the vagina or anus of a person by any body part of another person or by an object, or (2) the mouth of a person by a sex organ of another person, without that person’s consent;
  • Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law; or
  • Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. 
  • In order for individuals to engage in sexual activity of any type with each other, there must be clear, knowing and voluntary consent prior to and during sexual activity. Consent can be given by word or action, but non-verbal consent is not as clear. Consent to some form of sexual activity cannot be automatically taken as consent to any other form of sexual activity. Consent must be freely given.

In order to give effective consent one must be of legal age and capable of making such decision. Assent does not constitute consent if:

  • It is given by a person who lacks the mental capacity to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the offense and such mental incapacity is manifest or known to the actor; or
  • It is given by a person who by reason of youth, mental disease or defect, incapacitation, a drug-induced state, or any other reason is manifestly unable or known by the actor to be unable to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature or harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute the offense; or
  • It is induced by force, duress, or deception.

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence is a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed:

  • By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
  • By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
  • By a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;
  • By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or
  • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Dating Violence

Dating Violence is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. The existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Stalking

Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her or his safety or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress.

For purposes of this definition:

  • "Course of conduct" means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property;
  • "Substantial emotional distress" means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling; and
  • "Reasonable person" means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

Sexual Exploitation

Sexual exploitation occurs when one person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual violence offenses. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:

  • Invasion of sexual privacy;
  • Prostituting another person;
  • Non-consensual digital, video,or audio recording of nudity or sexual activity;
  • Unauthorized sharing or distribution of digital, video, or audio recording of nudity or sexual activity;
  • Engaging in voyeurism;
  • Going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as allowing someone to hide in a closet to watch you having consensual sex);
  • Knowingly exposing someone to or transmitting an STI, STD, or HIV to another person;
  • Intentionally or recklessly exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances;
  • Inducing another to expose their genitals;
  • Sexually based stalking and/or bullying.

Sexual Violence

For purposes of this policy, Sexual Violence collectively refers to the terms "sexual assault," "domestic violence," "dating violence," "stalking," and "sexual exploitation" as defined in this policy.

What to Do If You Have Been Sexually Assaulted

After an incident of sexual violence, one should consider seeking medical attention as soon as possible. As time passes, evidence may dissipate or become lost or unavailable, thereby making investigation, possible prosecution, disciplinary proceedings, or obtaining protection from abuse orders related to the incident more difficult. The following area hospitals provide physical evidence recovery kit collection and access to trained forensic nurse examiners and sexual assault nurses:

Barnes-Jewish St. Peters Hospital
10 Hospital Drive
St Peters, MO 63376
Phone: 636-916-9000

Progress West HealthCare Center
2 Progress Point Parkway
O'Fallon, MO 63368
Phone: 636-344-1000

SSM St. Joseph Health Center
300 First Capitol Drive
St. Charles, MO 63301
Phone: 636-947-5000

SSM St. Joseph Hospital West
100 Medical Plaza Lake
Saint Louis, MO 63367
Phone: 636-625-5200

SSM St. Joseph Health Center–Wentzville
500 Medical Drive
Wentzville, MO. 63385
Phone: 636-327-1000

In the State of Missouri, evidence may be collected even if you choose not to make a report to law enforcement.

It is important that a victim of sexual assault not bathe, douche, smoke, change clothing or clean the bed/linen/area where they were assaulted if the offense occurred within the past 96 hours, so that evidence may be preserved that may assist in proving that the alleged criminal offense occurred/or is occurring or may be helpful in obtaining a protection order.

In circumstances of sexual assault, if victims do not opt for forensic evidence collection, health care providers can still treat injuries and take steps to address concerns of pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted disease.

Victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and dating violence are encouraged to also preserve evidence by saving text messages, instant messages, social networking pages, other communications, and keeping pictures, logs, or other copies of documents, if they have any, that would be useful to SCC investigators or police.

Although the College strongly encourages all members of its community to report violations of this policy to law enforcement, it is the individual’s choice whether or not to make such a report and victims have the right to decline involvement with law enforcement. The College will assist any victim with notifying the local police department if they so desire.

On-Campus and Off-Campus Resources

How to Be An Active Bystander

Risk Reduction

How to Help a Friend After a Sexual Assault

  • Believe your friend. Being believed is an important component in recovery.
  • Make sure he/she has a safe place to stay.
  • Suggest going to the hospital, but don't force them.
  • Do not pry or ask for specific details.
  • Let your friend decide when he/she is ready to talk and how much he/she feels comfortable talking about.
  • Do not hug or touch your friend without getting permission.
  • Support your friend in making decisions.
  • Avoid making decisions for your friend.
  • Let your friend know that he/she is not guilty for being assaulted.
  • It is very common to feel angry, but it can be harmful. The victim already faced a person with out-of-control anger, and doesn't need to try to calm you down.
  • Encourage your friend to talk to a counselor.
  • Protect your friend's privacy.

This guide was adapted from the University of Rochester, University Health Service; Missouri State University, Office of Student Conduct; Western Virginia University, Student Health Services; Southeast Missouri State University, Peer Education Association; and St. Louis University, Human Resources.

Self Defense Class

PHE 221 Self Defense is an 8-week course taught by instructors who are highly trained in martial arts.

  • Instructions include unarmed defensive moves for use in response to dangerous situations. 
  • You will discover how to identify an attacker’s vulnerable targets along with quick defensive ways to protect yourself and disable your attacker. 
  • Within practical scenario drills, you will learn basic holds, releases, strikes, basic ground and weapon defense. 
  • The mental and emotional preparedness needed to cope with the trauma experienced in a violent situation will also be discussed and trained. 
  • This class is a must for all those interested in personal safety and the safety of loved ones. 
  • Reach a new level of fitness as you learn valuable awareness training and defensive skills.