Global Culture/Global Studies

Students will develop a fundamental level of international and intercultural competence and prepare for a role in an increasingly complex, interconnected and interdependent world. The coursework will also reinforce the four State-Level Skill Area Goals and the State-Level Knowledge Area Goals of the new General Education structure using an explicit global focus.

Classes offered for GLS credit:
(may not be offered every semester)

  • GLS 101 Introduction to Global Studies
  • GLS 290 Special Topics in Global Studies

Classes offered for GLC credit:
(may not be offered every semester)

  • GLC 105 Family History Research Practicum
  • GLC 133 Cultures of Central America and the Caribbean
  • GLC 135 Cultures of the Amazon and Andes
  • GLC 140 Celtic History and Contemporary Culture
  • GLC 145 The Theater in London
  • GLC 155 Central European History and Cultures
  • GLC 170 African Culture
  • GLC 180 Australian Culture
  • GLC 215 Intercultural Communication
  • GLC 210 Art of French Cinema
  • GLC 290 Special Topics Global Culture

SCC IS GOING TO FRANCE!

See the Study Tour to France page for more information. 

The Study Tour Concept

A study tour gives students the opportunity to experience first hand, historic sites and cultures. Instead of being in the classroom your classroom is wherever you are.

Study tours may be taken for credit or just for fun. If taking a tour for credit your on-site learning will be augmented through readings, writing, research and creative thinking assignments in order to meet the specific learning objectives of the course.

Some may consider credit for a travel program as "easy" credit. Rest assured, our study tour faculty will present a robust academic experience through the fun and adventure of travel.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do study tours award credit for travel?

No. Study tours award credit for academically rigorous work including evaluation by the instructor regarding a learner's success in meeting specific learning objectives. Saying that a study tour gives credit for travel is like saying that on-campus courses give credit for sitting in a classroom.

What kind of academic work is accomplished in a study tour course?

The kind and amount of work varies with each tour and the amount of credit attempted by the individual learner (some study tours offer variable 1-3 hours of credit).

Often such work includes:

  • one to three pre-tour lectures/workshops
  • detailed field or travel journals
  • lists of assigned readings
  • book reports
  • practical experiences
  • on-site tours and lectures
  • field identification exercises
  • independent "challenges" (for example, "it's your turn to guide this group from Montparnasse to the Latin Quarter").

Study tours also typically require at least one major project demonstrating learning such as a research paper, classroom presentation, annotated photo journal and so on.

Are there any tests or exams involved in a study tour?

Yes. Sometimes traditional written, oral or practical testing procedures are used for some components of a study tour.

Are study tours, especially those in Africa and other "rough spots," dangerous?

Yes. Any sort of travel, whether down Highway 94 in St. Charles County or across the Atlantic involve certain risks to life and limb. Statistically, our study tours offer no more risk than simply coming to campus (often LESS risk). Nonetheless, study tour directors are very careful in minimizing risk. Pre-tour sessions train travelers in risk-management. Tour leaders provide up-to-date information from CDC, State Department, and other sources regarding safety, health and other issues of concern. All participants sign statements assuming full responsibility and liability for risks incurred and also relieve the college and its employees from liability.

Study Tour Instructor Characteristics

  • Experience in study tour education (primary instructor)
  • Masters degree or better in primary teaching field and in at least one component of each interdisciplinary course (should have other training/experience in interlaced fields)
  • Demonstrated outstanding ability to teach in the field and in other informal and non-classroom settings
  • Exhibits group leadership and coordination skills
  • Proficient in sociological and psychological management of groups in close quarters under intense conditions
  • Thinks and teaches in an interdisciplinary manner
  • Motivates learners to explore, interact and learn from new environments and situations
  • Ability to deal with travel issues, concerns and crises

Employers, interested in hiring SCC graduates or student interns? Find out more.

Degrees & Certificates

Apply Now!

Learn More about SCCabout SCC

Program Contact

Denise McCracken
636-922-8447
dmccracken@stchas.edu

Office Coordinator

Karen Murray
636-922-8556
kmurray@stchas.edu

Office Info

Office Hours

8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday
8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Friday

Office Location

Humanities Building, Room 203

Office Phone Number

636-922-8556